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Scientists Reveal Genetic Mutation Responsible For Tuberculosis Risk

Scientists Reveal Genetic Mutation Responsible For Tuberculosis Risk
Alice Dotson
Written by Alice Dotson

Individuals living in the U.S. are not likely to come into contact with the microbe that triggers tuberculosis. The chances of an individual to come across the microbe are so less, in fact, that risk factors for the disease can simply go ignored. If a person happened to hold a gene that inclined them to tuberculosis, they probably would not know the same. New outcomes of a study by the researchers at the Rockefeller University reveal that such type a genetic variant exists. And surprisingly, it’s widespread.

The researchers also revealed the genetic alterations that steal the immune system of an individual and their ability to fight more omnipresent germs of the similar bacterial family, mycobacteria. In two new studies, both available online in the journal Science Immunology, they clarify molecular irregularities that make individuals open to mycobacterial infections. This study also points to methods for avoiding or treating some tuberculosis cases.

On a similar note, scientists from the University Of Notre Dame revealed that they have found a pathogen named Mycobacterium tuberculosis that releases RNA into contaminated cells. Then, this RNA triggers the production of a compound named interferon beta. This compound seems to encourage the pathogen growth. This research is published online in the Journal of Experimental Medicine.

As part of the research, the scientists discovered that mice with absence of an import protein needed for responding to foreign RNA and therefore needed for the production of interferon beta were better able to manage the Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. This was a surprise finding to the researchers, as interferon beta is important in controlling some viral infections. Jeff Schorey, George B. Craig Jr. Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, Notre Dame, co-author of the research, proclaimed that the outcomes highlight that our immune response to mycobacterial RNA is helpful for the pathogen and unpleasant for the host.

About the author

Alice Dotson

Alice Dotson

Having experience in the field of Medical of more than three years, Alice is the one who leads and manages the Medical department. She has done her Bachelors in Microbiology, which is why she has status at Global News Journal. She also has a couple of interns whom he loves to guide. Apart from the busy schedule at Global News Journal, Alice likes to spend her time with her family and have a fun time with them.

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