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Novel Cancer Medication Advances Radiation Therapy Securely

Novel Cancer Medication Advances Radiation Therapy Securely
Alice Dotson
Written by Alice Dotson

Cancer persists to be one of the chief reasons of fatality in the U.S. According to the NCI (National Cancer Institute), there will be approximately 1,735,350 fresh cancer cases by the end of this year, out of which 609,640 people will be dead. Reportedly, radiation therapy also known as radiotherapy is one of the most usual treatments utilized in fighting against cancer. About 60% of cancer patients aid from radiation, which is used on its own or along with chemotherapy.

Radiotherapy functions by pricking the DNA within cancer cells. These puncturing further blocks the cancer cells from developing and proliferating, eventually making they die. Therapists can use radiation to wipe out cancer tumors totally or to contract them in preparation for the surgical procedure. This completely depends on the kind of tumor, as a number of cancers are extra sensitive to radiotherapy than others. Recent research might have found out a technique to enhance the strength of radiation therapy adjacent to cancer cells. Surgeons directed a new drug called IPdR (5-iodo-2-pyrimidinone-2′-deoxyribose), which is also known as ropidoxuridine. This drug is used for people with cancer in mixture with radiotherapy. Dr. Timothy Kinsella—of Rhode Island Hospital and Brown University—presented the outcomes of the clinical trial during a symposium on “Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Ireland.”

Recently, the NCI was also in news as the institute presented a grant to the MCCC (Mayo Clinic Cancer Center) for helping cancer patients to quit tobacco. The 2-Year, $500,000 grant is a part of the NCI’s “Cancer Moonshot Initiative.” This program will subsidize curriculums at the MCCC and the Mayo Clinic’s NDC (Nicotine Dependence Center) that will develop tobacco cessation management services for cancer patients. Dr. Thulasee Jose—a research fellow working on the study—stated that this grant will aid us in helping by offering proof-based tobacco cessation support to cancer patients who consume tobacco.

About the author

Alice Dotson

Alice Dotson

Managing the Health department is Alice, who has a Master’s Degree in Microbiology. She is very scientific in her work and hence is the reason as to why she looks after the Health Department. The 5+ years of experience adds one more feather to Alice’s cap. When she is not her computer working for Global News Journal, you’ll probably find her exploring a new beach or city at any corner of the world!

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